Marina - Page 2

Marina has 15 articles published.

Clement’s response to Marina’s message

Below is Clement’s reply to my message about the first mod, Holy Grail R1/A:

Hi Marina,
 
First of all, there is no problem in criticizing a fragrance, I mean that’s what makes the perfumer go forward! So any opinion is more than welcome!!! Then it’s my job to interpret them to modify the fragrance.
Actually, I found your comments pretty clear and accurate…When you talk about the almond note… that aspect of the fragrance is created by the combination of some powdery milky and sweet notes like cinnamon and vanilla, and citrus notes such as mandarine and orange. And I will remove that effect in the further mods.
Also, from what I understood, it’s pretty clear you want something much richer, raw, straight to the point,  with much more signature and personality, I guess I was a little too shy in my first trial…
Work is already in progress so be ready!

Clement.

Marina’s Message to Clement

This concludes Marina’s Round 1 with sketch R1/A.
The first Mod (trial, version) of my Holy Grail has arrived! Below is my reaction / message to Clement:

Dear Clement,
 
I am so very excited to receive my first “Mod”! Thank you so much once again for agreeing to make my very own Holy Grail. I have never had a perfume done especially for me before and I find it difficult to review something that was so kindly created for me and even harder to actually criticize. It feels awkward to say the least.
 
I want to start by saying that I think my first Mod, “Holy Grail R1/A” is a very pretty scent. It smells feminine and light, almost ethereal. I also smell a lot of almond here. Perhaps my nose is playing tricks on me and there is no almond there? It is not one of my favorite notes and, unless it is crucial for the composition, I would prefer not to include it. If I had to describe how the scent smells right now, I would say it smells of almond, light vanilla and a little bit of musk. It reminds me of scents like Castelbajac, Lea St Barth and Strenesse. In my opinion, these are light, somewhat fresh, “cool” scents. I would like my fragrance to be quite a bit heavier, more “substantial”, much “warmer”, much spicier and much “darker” than it is now.  I wonder if what I am saying actually makes any sense and I apologize if it doesn’t.
 
To sum it up, I would like the scent to become heavier and spicier. More sultry, more sensual. I would like the musk note to be less transparent than it is now, in fact I would love for it to become “dirtier”, more animalic. A more pronounced cardamom note would also make me very happy as would an addition of a warmer, more robust woody note and some amber.
 
I would love to hear from you regarding the scent, the first Mod and my ramblings about them.
 
Bestest of wishes,
 
Marina.

Please tune in next week for Clement’s response to my review of the first Mod.

Marina’s Holy Grail


Dear Clement,

Before I begin my proposal, I wanted to thank you in advance for agreeing to create my very own perfume. I cannot describe how exciting it is for me to have this opportunity to work with you. I promise to try not to be a very difficult client.

I want my scent to be spicy. I adore cardamom and saffron, and would love my scent to be centered on these two notes. These would be soft, velvety spices, as opposed to “red hot” and “dry”. To achieve that kind of softness, to balance the spices, I believe that iris, with its delicate, smooth, rooty quality, might be a great ingredient to use. I think that a little (and I really mean just a little) vanilla might also be necessary in order to achieve the kind of velvety softness I have in mind for this scent. I also would like the fragrance to have a certain sensual depth, that is why I also imagine musk as one of the notes. Again, this would be a soft, understated note, simply serving as a background for the spices. Finally, to complete and further balance the composition, the drydown would have notes of sandalwood and perhaps cedar.

To sum it up, the notes in the scent would be: cardamom, saffron, iris, vanilla, musk, sandalwood, cedar. It might also include cinnamon and amber for added spiciness and “fuller body” as well as violet to enhance the iris note. But in this case, I would rely on your judgment whether these extra notes or any other notes might be needed.

Velvety, warm, spicy, sensual are the descriptions that I would like for my scent to evoke. This would be a golden, candlelit perfume, enveloping the wearer in the smoothest embrace. I would love for this scent to be sensual and romantic, and, yes, sexy, but I also want it to be easy so wear, in other words I would like it not to be too heady, too heavy, too overwhelming ... too demanding.

I am undoubtedly drawing inspiration from some of my favorite perfumes. I want a fragrance that would be sensually-musky like Musc Ravageur by Frederic Malle, sweetly spicy like Safran Troublant by L’Artisan, exquisitely floral like Attrape-Coeur by Guerlain, and velvety-woody like Bois des Iles by Chanel…all the most wonderful qualities of my favorite fragrances, combined in one glorious scent, my Holy Grail…

And that brings me to the question of the name…I am a member of a wonderful site called Makeupalley.com. It is a place where perfume addicts like me meet and chat about perfumes and write reviews. On that site, a perfume that one considers to be the most favorite and/or the best of its kind is called a “Holy Grail”. For example, one would say something like, “Bois des Iles is my Holy Grail scent”. Or, “Musc Ravageur is my Holy Grail musk perfume”. Or, “Hermes Hiris is my Holy Grail iris”. So…I thought of naming my scent just that, Holy Grail.

Thank you again! I would love to hear your opinion about all and any aspects of my dream fragrance.

Best wishes,

Marina

Marina’s Bio »

Marina (Perfume Smellin’ Things)

pst.gifCliché as it is to look for the roots of one’s interests and obsessions in childhood and to hold one’s parents responsible for the good, the bad, and the ugly traits of one’s character, my fascination with perfume has indeed started when I was a small child enthralled by mother’s fragrances displayed on her vanity table and absolutely forbidden for me to touch. This was during the Soviet times; the Western perfumes were extremely hard to find, and I really cannot imagine where my mother unearthed her beautiful bottles. If I close my eyes, I can see some of them now…Madame Rochas in its exquisite box ornamented with golden lace. Magie Noire in the black, mysterious flacon. The light, feminine bottle of Anais Anais…They looked so chic, so “French”; when I surreptitiously applied the fragrances to my wrists, they transported me to the glamorous, thrilling world so unlike my mundane everyday existence.

Ever since I have been interested in perfume. When a couple of years ago I discovered various fragrance forums and perfume blogs, the interest has blossomed into an obsession, an addiction. Before I knew it, I had a perfume blog of my own, Perfume Smellin’ Things. It was my own little corner of the Internet, where I could indulge in talking about perfume, only perfume and nothing but perfume. Nothing pleases me more then finding and reviewing an interesting, evocative scent that touches something in my soul, that stirs a memory, that takes me to the faraway lands. I love it when a scent makes me think of a painting, a book, a song, a poem (I am prone to quoting Baudelaire and Neruda at any given opportunity and at great length in my blog).

In my non-blogging life I am a mother of a sweet little girl and a wife of a man who is thankfully very tolerant towards my perfume “hobby.” My education and professional experience lie in the field of sociology and social anthropology; neither my studies nor my work has ever been perfume-related in any way. So if you asked me what qualifications I have for writing about fragrances, my honest answer would be that I have none. My only qualification is my undying love for perfume.

I am incredibly thrilled to be a part of this project. I have always dreamed about a perfume created just for me, just the way I wanted it to be. However I am also looking forward to learning more about the process of perfume creation, to getting a peek into an exciting, mysterious world of perfumers.

Marina’s Proposal: “Holy Grail” »